Medieval Verse: Rhyme Royal

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April 27, 2015 by phicks2012

ctree2.”Rhyme royal is a very simple form
That lends itself to English very well;
Five feet of iambs in each line’s the norm.
If you can rhyme line one with three that’s swell;
Line two with four and five and you’ll excel!
The last two lines think they are both the best
And rhyme just with each other, not the rest”

According to Wikipedia at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhyme_royalForm

“The rhyme royal stanza consists of seven lines, usually in iambic pentameter. The rhyme scheme is a-b-a-b-b-c-c. In practice, the stanza can be constructed either as a tercet and two couplets (a-b-a, b-b, c-c) or a quatrain and a tercet (a-b-a-b, b-c-c). This allows for variety, especially when the form is used for longer narrative poems. Along with the couplet, it was the standard narrative metre in the late Middle Ages.

Chaucer first used the rhyme royal stanza in his long poems Troilus and Criseyde and Parlement of Foules. He also used it for four of the Canterbury Tales: the Man of Law’s Tale, the Prioress’ Tale, the Clerk’s Tale, and the Second Nun’s Tale, and in a number of shorter lyrics. He may have adapted the form from a French ballade stanza or from the Italian Ottava rima, with the omission of the fifth line.
James I of Scotland used rhyme royal for his Chaucerian poem The Kingis Quair, and it is believed that the name of the stanza derives from this royal use. English and Scottish poets were greatly influenced by Chaucer in the century after his death and most made use of the form in at least some of their works. John Lydgate used the stanza for many of his occasional and love poems. The Scottish poet Robert Henryson consistently used the stanza throughout his two longest works, the Morall Fabillis and Testament of Cresseid, while the anonymous The Flower and the Leaf is another early use of the form. In the 16th century Thomas Wyatt used it in his poem They flee from me that sometime did me seek, Thomas Sackville in the Induction to The Mirror for Magistrates, Alexander Barclay in his Ship of Fools and Stephen Hawes in his Pastime of Pleasure.
The seven-line stanza began to go out of fashion during the Elizabethan era but it was still used by John Davys in Orchestra and by William Shakespeare in The Rape of Lucrece. Edmund Spenser wrote his Hymn of Heavenly Beauty using rhyme royal but he also derived his own Spenserian stanza with the rhyme scheme a-b-a-b-b-c-b-c-c partly by adapting rhyme royal. Like many stanzaic forms, rhyme royal fell out of fashion during the Restoration, and has never been widely used since. However, William Wordsworth employed rhyme royal (slightly modified by an alexandrine in the seventh line) in “Resolution and Independence”, and notable twentieth-century poems in the stanza are W. H. Auden’s Letter to Lord Byron (as well as some of the stanzas in The Shield of Achilles) and W. B. Yeats’s A Bronze Head. The example below, composed in the 14th century, is from Chaucer and if, as some scholars believe, it is one of his earliest poems, then it is possibly the first manifestation of the form in English.”

An example given is the opening stanza of Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde:

The double sorwe of Troilus to tellen,
That was the king Priamus sone of Troye,
In lovinge, how his aventures fellen
Fro wo to wele, and after out of Ioye,
My purpos is, er that I parte fro ye,
Thesiphone, thou help me for tendyte
Thise woful vers, that wepen as I wryt

 
Since so much information has already been outlined, I agree that this is a simple form to use, and feel I really need add nothing else except my own short attempt at Rhyme Royal, shown below and written for our SCA newsletter.

 
Rhyme Royal No.1: The Meridian Banner

Raise up the Banner, high upon the wind;
The crown and stars against an azure sky.
The sable and the argent to transcend,
All other loyalties and magnify,
The scope of dreams we seek to glorify.
A promise flown above a verdant field,
Reminding all to serve, and never yield.

[28 April, 2013]

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phicks2012

phicks2012

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